Title:

A mechanistic approach to preventing atrophy and restoring function in older adults.

Investigators:

Hans Dreyer, PhD (PI); Brian A. Jewett, MD; Brick A. Lantz, MD; Steven N. Shah, MD; Craig G. Mohler, MD; Anita Christie, PhD; Li-Shan Chou, PhD.

Partner(s):

University of Oregon Department of Human Physiology

Funding:

R01 National Institute of Aging

Project Period:

May 2014 - February 2019

Summary:

Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery is primarily performed on older adults and results in significant muscle atrophy in the operative and non-operative thigh (quadriceps and hamstrings), which compromises balance, impairs functional mobility, and dramatically increases the risk of falls and related injuries. For older adults, muscle atrophy occurring during periods of inactivity or following surgery may be more difficult to recover. The purpose of this study is to determine mechanisms by which essential amino acid supplementation before and after surgery acts on muscle protein synthesis, and determine whether decreased muscle atrophy, weakness and functioning after supplementation persists at six months and one year post-operatively.

Related publications:

Dreyer HC, Strycker LA, Senesac HA, Hocker AD, Smolkowski K, Shah SN, and Jewett BA. Essential amino acid supplementation in patients following total knee arthroplasty. J Clin Invest 2013; 123(11): 4654-4666.

Title:

Examining the association between patient activation and cost, utilization, and outcomes among patients with common orthopedic conditions.

Investigators:

Erin Owen, MPH; Jason Tavakolian, MD; Jeff Luck, PhD; Jangho Yoon, PhD; Viktor Bovbjerg, PhD

Partner(s):

Oregon State University College of Public Health & Human Sciences

Funding:

Slocum Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Project Period:

June 2014 – December 2017

Summary:

Patients need to have the knowledge, skills and confidence to understand their own role in the care plan. A short assessment tool, called the patient activation measure (PAM), has been piloted in various care settings. The PAM score has been demonstrated to predict health-related outcomes and behaviors, particularly in older populations with chronic diseases. Our goal is to implement administration of a pre-operative PAM assessment in adults with distal radius fractures, and those electing to have a total knee replacement. The proposed project has the potential result in better, individually tailored, patient-centered care, improve health-related outcomes, and as a result, lower costs across the system.

 

Title:

Redefining “value” in the treatment of distal radius fractures.

Investigators:

Jason Tavakolian, MD; Erin Owen, MPH

Partner(s):

Oregon State University College of Public Health & Human Sciences; the Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care

Funding:

Slocum Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Project Period:

Planning stage

Summary:

Distal radius fractures account for nearly one-fifth of all fractures in the United States. There exists debate regarding the treatment of closed fractures – cast or surgical intervention? Yet, currently published studies on patient-reported outcomes suggest variability in “success” following intervention has not been fully described using currently available tools. To better define what patients value in distal radius fracture treatment and rehabilitation, we will form a patient and family advisory committee to redefine the value equation.

 

Title:

Prospective observational study: Dynamic stabilization of humeral shaft fractures using Active Plating technology.

Investigators:

Michael Bottlang, PhD & Steven Madey, MD; Legacy Health, Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory.

Daniel Fitzpatrick, MD, MS & Daniel Sheerin, MD; Slocum Orthopedics

Partner(s):

Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory, Portland, OR

Funding:

Slocum Center for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Project Period:

2016 - 2018

Summary:

The Active Locking Plate study will document fracture healing and implant performance for stabilization of humeral shaft fractures.

 

Title:

Multi-center ACL revision study (MARS)

Investigators:

Brick Lantz, MD and Rudolf Hoellrich, MD

Partner(s):

MARS investigator group; Vanderbilt University, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Project Period:

2008 – current

Summary:

The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of modifiable risk factors on patient-reported quality of life, physical activity levels, and risk of early osteoarthritis following revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

The investigators hypothesize that modifiable variables exist at the time of revision ACL reconstruction (e.g., cause of failure, current graft source and type, surgical exposure, and femoral and tibial tunnel position) which will be predictors of patient-reported outcomes.

 

Title:

A multi-center, randomized, clinical outcome study of VISIONAIRE patient-matched technology vs. standard surgical instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty.

Investigators:

Brick Lantz, MD

Funding:

Smith and Nephew, Inc.

Project Period:

2010 – 2016

Summary:

The objective of this study is to assess outcomes following TKA, utilizing two surgical techniques. Patients will be randomized to one of two arms: TKA with standard instrumentation and TKA with VISIONAIRE™ patient-matched cutting blocks. Data will be collected at preoperative, operative/discharge, 3 months, 1 year and 2 years after TKA. The secondary objective of this study is to compare the safety, quality of life, and economic outcomes of TKA when these two techniques are utilized. This study does not involve treatment or investigational products, as all components are FDA cleared and are commercially available.

 

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